the Space Force, or when science fiction expands

Many I know are outraged or at least mock the new United States military branch, the Space Force. But hang on a minute. Nobody even knows what the charter of this new branch is, or who and what capabilities the “force” will require. But once humans venturing into space number in the several hundred and then thousands, some military discipline may be needed.

While humans have been going into space for sixty years, it has primarily been the United States or the Russians. The International Space Station is still primarily a venture between several nations. And recently the Chinese indicated they will venture to the Moon. It has only been in the last ten years or so, that commercial exploration and development of space has been moving from science fiction into something people now living will see. (If we do not kill ourselves from a pandemic first.)

In popular culture, for more than forty years, various incarnations of a futurist “space force”, Star Trek, and blockbuster movies about space forces – rebels versus a militarist empire (Star Wars) – have captured the world’s imagination. If you have heard or become a fan of the television series, The Expanse, now filming its 5th season, you should be at least curious how life is imitating art. Without giving plot twists and turns away for those who have not seen this series, the premise of this show begins with an alien technology discovered and then manipulated by corrupt industrialists, politicians and military leaders. As the different plots are developed, it is apparent that the future is a lot like our present.

Forgetting for a moment about alien technology, impending death, romance, betrayal, and deceit, what has motivated me to support the real-life introduction of a “Space Force” is a historical perspective. When mankind set off in sailing vessels, like the Minoans in the Mediterranean five to six thousand years ago, or the Polynesians who ventured across the Pacific to the Hawaiian Islands a thousand years ago, or to South America as some suggest, in each society, military forces developed. When the Greeks, Ottomans, Spanish, French, and British, started venturing in search of trade, territorial expansion, and so forth, fishermen and merchants were not the sole adventurers. Military forces were also there, to protect the culture’s interests.

While people may still mock the introduction of a Space Force, the militarization of space has been unavoidable. This has been a logical step since science fiction first dreamed about living on other worlds. With human motivations ranging from curiosity to power lust, an altruistic policing of space is fantasy. Missile-launched nuclear weapons are in numerous arsenals. And once someone – a terrorist, a corrupt politician, or a loose alliance of rogue “Belters” have achieved an advantage in space, who will have the resources – and the quick-response positioning to protect individual, scientific or commercial enterprise?

E pleg nista

It is the Fourth of July, American Independence day;  it is the 242nd anniversary of a group of revolutionaries to pen a  “Dear George (King) letter”.  A random thought in a comment I made to my blogging buddy from across the Atlantic,  Little Fears, was all it took for this particular post to spring forth:

Funny that it all started over Tea, Taxes, and that royal thing… Now we have tea everywhere (though mostly ICED – which the UK knows nothing about;  in California specifically we pay the highest taxes (but don’t/won’t/can’t revolt); and if we aren’t swooning over British royals, we are treating celebrities as though they were royals!  

And I started thinking what it might be like in an alternate universe ,,,, which then lead to me thinking about an old, old episode of Star Trek ( the original 1968 version) when there was this episode,  The Omega Glory, about a distant inhabited planet that had a parallel history to the United States.  But war had destroyed everything but emnity between the Yangs and the Congs.

Of course, in the early decades of the Twenty-First Century, we all know that this is a very improbable scenario.  Even Neal Degrasse Tyson would be hard pressed to deduce the probability of an inhabited world somewhere in our galaxy having a parallel history to our Earth.

But imagine,   what if there had been no Revolution, no war over taxes and tea?    Something to ponder over coffee.

(Ed. note: had to make amends to die-hard Trekkies – I re-listened to the episode and it’s  e pleB nista  and Comms— but you get my drift)