Ask the Chief: bilingual comprehension

My late mother, an Naturalized (immigrant) citizen of the United States, graduated from the Mount Sinai Nursing School and was an RN most of her adult life. Pursuing a lifelong interest in literature, she earned a Masters degree and in her second career, was a junior college English teacher. Her most cherished students were often not the native-born, but the ones who had emigrated to the United States from places English was not the native tongue. These immigrants were “all-in”, that is totally committed to not just speak the language but have comprehension, which would enable them to be successful at work and fully-appreciated citizens in the community.

That was forty years ago and while the same issues over immigration, national identity, and common language existed then as today, there was far less accommodation then for non-English speakers in the community. Today, there are many government services from schools, courts, county and state offices that serve communities where residents primary language may be Spanish, Tagalog, or Arabic. The United States remains a melting pot of cultures and immigrants from all over the world, though in some states Spanish is the largest language group next to English. Yet employment in professions that require Federal and State certification, licensing, or as college graduates, often require a competence in English first and bilingual as a supporting skill. This has been a continuing issue with secondary (high school) education nationally for decades. People are looking to enter the workforce with poor grammar, and poor reading comprehension. Business writing, reading standard government forms and test instructions are often poorly understood and done incorrectly.

College placement tests bear this out, and offerings of remedial writing classes in community colleges, universities and private for-profit institutions testify to substandard high school standards. For both immigrants from non-English speaking places and native-born, the aspiration to be successful in a profession drives performance. However, some for-profit schools do not assess competence in speaking, writing or reading at a level that will enable a non-native speaker of English to be successful. An unfortunate consequence for many candidates for state licensing, governed by both Federal and State statutes, failure of the written exam or other assessment (conducted in English) is a costly lesson.

Yet there have been private as well as government-programs, online and various means to gain competence through ESL – English as a Second Language -adapted for various professions. While many businesses do cater to specific communities, staff who communicate primarily in a language other than English may have issues meeting Federal requirements for that institution. Meeting Federal guidelines at the workplace and successfully gaining employment requires comprehension at a fairly basic level. However, many private post-secondary education businesses attract students with lower fees and quick preparation for licensing exams. It may be outside their scope to add rigorous language preparation in their curriculum.

Veterans’ benefits include technical training

The Veterans Administration introduced in October 2019, a five-year pilot program to permit veterans with Post-9/11 or Montgomery GI Bill Education benefits to attend technical training. The Veteran Employment Through Technology Education Courses (VET TEC) is focused on training veterans to obtain highly-skilled and in-demand careers. Veterans need to apply to the program, and the annual acceptance is limited by its annually-renewed budget. For those whose eligibility time limit to use benefits has not elapsed, or for those with at minimum, one day of eligibility remaining, the tuition is not charged against their education benefit. Those accepted into VET TEC are eligible for a MHA housing stipend equal to BAH while attending the program.

Find additional information and the application process via the VA website link provided.

Ask the Chief: Veterans applying to For-profit colleges

For a United States military veteran, spouse, or her (his) child under 26, education benefits earned during military service (either on Active Duty, Guard or Reserve) provide a stipend for education leading to a degree or training leading to certification. These benefits not only can be used for the tuition but provide a housing allowance to ease the potential financial burden while attending school. Though I used the GI Bill benefit for a university in the 1980s, there are many choices in college, technical and trade schools for veterans in the Post 9/11 (2001) period. Since 2017, statutory change has removed some issues that affected older veterans such as expiration of those education benefits for veterans whose Active service ended prior to 2013. The Veterans Administration has a website illustrating the different benefits here.

Obtaining employment as a veteran has been complicated by the pandemic. Many industries deemed essential, including healthcare, engineering and construction have been operating with a continuing demand for workers. However, even for veterans a technical skill without industry-recognized certification or a technical degree can slow career advancement and receipt of competitive salaries. With the burgeoning demand for healthcare and technology careers, many two – and four- year public institutions are wait-listing enrollment. As a consequence, many communities have seen an increase in the number of private for-profit schools offering programs to prepare candidates for State certification and licensing. Of importance to any prospective candidate these schools must first be approved by the State to conduct training. When was the school last approved? Additionally, they must have accreditation from regional or national Boards that monitor standards in the occupations. Which accrediting board and what is their standing? The schools must comply with state and federal regulations to allow students to obtain Federal or use GI Bill funds. Has there been any compliance issues? Another thing worth noting by prospective students is a school’s job placement rate. In contrast to colleges and universities which have no criteria about graduates working in their chosen profession, private post-secondary education are held to license and certification test performance and job placement standards. It is important for prospective students to ask for this information when canvassing a school.

In California, private post-secondary education is not under the oversight of Department of Education, but rather the Bureau for Private Post-Secondary Education, under the Department of Consumer Affairs. It should be one of the first places a veteran student goes when deciding where to enroll. Under the Approved Schools webpage, one may review the school’s annual report, performance fact sheets, and any compliance issues as well as resolution of those compliance issues. Yelp reviews, and social media claims may provide some comfort, but hard data is where veterans should find a basis for decisions. For current and future students, lessons of other students learned painfully over the last decade should serve to illustrate why one’s research in where to attend is crucial. In the midst of successful small businesses preparing students to become Nursing Assistants, Electronic Engineering Technicians, Diesel Mechanics, and Computer software and networking professionals, there are some bad performers. Some institutions are run ineptly, inefficiently or into bankruptcy. This is what occurred with ITT Technical Institute when it lost its access to federal funds. Other failed schools like California’s Corinthian Colleges and nationally, with Education Corporation of America (ECA) schools had former students (and employees) scrambling after the closing their doors. Some have not had relief from the federal Government since those events occurred. With the new Administration, former students unable to recoup losses in time spent in the classroom may yet obtain debt relief.

In 2021, President Biden signed legislation that absolves the debt of many students victimized by these failed businesses. Yet the takeaway from this story is to be prudent and sober in deciding one’s educational plan. Universities are not without their own issues of admissions scandals or tuition bruhaha over the pandemic’s shutdowns, streaming classrooms, and the previously mentioned lack of accountability for graduates being employed in their degree profession. However, thousands of graduates of institutions like National University, Kaplan University, and the vast majority of small businesses produce very qualified candidates who are working in their professions as entrepreneurs, staff of major healthcare providers, technology, services and in engineering firms nationally. And another, often overlooked factor, is the teachers and mentors in these private enterprises have often worked until recently in the industry they are teaching, bringing a wealth of real-world perspective to the classroom. In the end, it should be a well-thought out decision to attend a public or a private trade school.

Ask the Chief: obtain credentials in the service

If I had the opportunity to mentor young Sailors just beginning their Navy career, I would counsel them to take advantage of every opportunity afforded them in the training the Navy provides. However, there are opportunities far beyond “A” school or specialization “C” schools, to develop natural talents and intellect. In fact, there are many opportunities to develop personally and professionally, only limited by the individual’s awareness of them. For decades the military has facilitated correspondence and on-base college classes offered for off-duty servicemembers. There is access to Tuition Assistance which many have used for off-duty education at local colleges. Recreational programs through MWR (Morale, Welfare and Recreation) offices have included SCUBA certification, rock climbing, auto mechanics and woodworking, with skilled mentors available. One of the longest associations for obtaining professional tradesman certification, is through Journeyman Apprenticeship in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Labor.

Credit by examination, correspondence courses, classroom work, and military training -equivalence credit have been accepted by many universities to obtain a college degree. This has facilitated motivated Sailors, Marines and other service members to advance in their military specialties. In the last twenty years, particularly since 2013, the rapid development of technology and the drive for a more qualified and educated service member, has brought about a watershed of opportunity for both enlisted military, commissioned officers and civilian employees of the Department of Defense. Through online resources access to education, credentialing, and licensure has meant that anyone can complete a military enlistment and return to the civilian workforce with qualifications that are immediately recognized by employers.

Through the United Service Military Apprenticeship Program (USMAP), ratings and occupational specialties have translated to civilian trades, by crediting work experience toward Journeyman certification. While I was aware of, and enrolled in, this credential program in 1989 – 1990, I took advantage of other education opportunities in place of becoming a Journeyman. At the same time that civilian trades people were seeing a decline in young people engaging in those occupations, by the second decade of the millennium, the military had seen significant growth in participation in an apprenticeship program. This was documented in a DOL study published in late 2015. Beginning in 2002 with the Army, all the service branches have embraced Credentialing Opportunities Online (COOL) to coordinate military and civilian employees of the respective branches becoming a more professional workforce. COOL does not offer accreditation but instead facilitates access to resources for individuals looking to pursue licenses and certifications in their respective occupations.

A future post will examine some of the best available college courses, though not for credit, yet available completely free of charge. These are available through a consortium of American universities, often delivered by online lecture with complete syllabi, notes and assignments.

Is it time to head back to school?

This week’s Guest Post, is by blogger Kelli Brewer. Kelli is part of DeployCare, made up of veterans and their families which offers free support to service members and their families – she shares resources and solutions for issues commonly faced by military families before, during and after deployment. Please visit their website for additional articles on various topics of importance to veterans -Ed

Are you thinking about going back to school now that your time in service is done? If so, keep reading. Popeye To Admiral wants veterans and their families to have access to the best educational resources available. With this in mind, here are a few quick tips for vets set on earning a degree after their time in service.

Choose Wisely

When it’s time to go back to school, your first obligation is to choose an academic or vocational program. Be cautious here, however, because not all schools are G.I. Bill-approved. Furthermore, many schools suffer from accreditation complications, tarnished reputations, and few working graduates.

Aside from school, you’ll also want to take your time when making a decision on your major. There are many fields that make sense for veterans, including management and law enforcement. Another highly sought-after degree is information technology. Any of these — and many more — can be earned all or partially online. This is more important than ever in the pandemic society in which we live.

Start Small

Even if you are eligible for veteran funds, it might make sense to consider a community college for your first two years. Crucially, if you plan to use your G.I. Bill benefits for your children, many states now pay for an associate degree — meaning the funds may be used toward a graduate degree. U.S. News & World Report asserts that money is just one reason to consider a community college over a university when just starting out.

If you are not yet sure what you would like to do, you can also start off earning a certification. Taking a career aptitude test geared toward veterans can help you decide what type of job you would like in the civilian world. There are many options ranging from entry-level medical to business management.

Trade School Is An Option

Finally, keep in mind that you do not have to go to college to complete your education. You may also consider trade school to earn your HVAC or electrical license or ASE mechanic certification. Blue-collar jobs often pay as well as white-collar jobs, and some of them are even more lucrative.

For more information about going back to school, contact your institute of choice’s admissions counselor. Good luck in your endeavors, and thank you for your service.

Popeye To Admiral offers quips and quick bites of wisdom for veterans and their families. Visit the blog often for your daily dose of delectable posts and veteran resources. Let us know more of what sort of resources you might want to see. You can also find us on Facebook here, .